Saturday, 23 March 2019

6th Asia Pacific Gynecology and Obstetrics Congress: New trends in Gynecology @Gynecology Congress 2019...

6th Asia Pacific Gynecology and Obstetrics Congress: New trends in Gynecology @Gynecology Congress 2019...: The new study finds that bacteria and immunity in the cervix may be key to predicting premature birth Spontaneous preter...

New trends in Gynecology @Gynecology Congress 2019 #July 26-27 2019#Melbourne, Australia

The new study finds that bacteria and immunity in the cervix may be key to predicting premature birth






Spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB), defined as birth before 37 weeks of gestation, and the related complications, are the largest contributors to infant death in the United States and worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have discovered that bacteria and innate immune factors in a woman’s birth canal and cervix may increase the risk of spontaneous preterm birth or provide protection against such births.

Results of the study, which was conducted in collaboration with the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, were published today in Nature Communications. This groundbreaking research provides information that could help physicians better predict and prevent these preterm births. The study sets the path for new research to develop a rational strategy that would target “bad” bacteria or increase “protective” bacteria.
The findings are key as babies who survive an early birth often face serious, costly, and life-long health problems, including breathing problems, vision loss, cerebral palsy, and intellectual delays. The economic burden of preterm birth is staggering, with an estimated cost of $26 billion per year in the United States alone, according to the National Academy of Sciences estimates. A failure to predict and understand the causes of preterm birth have limited the development of effective interventions and therapeutics.
In this study, researchers examined vaginal swabs from a sample of 2,000 pregnant women taken at three distinct points in pregnancy to determine the bacteria that made up the cervicovaginal microbiota. This is the largest cohort of pregnant women in whom the cervicovaginal microbiota was studied. Using innovative modeling of the cervicovaginal microbiota, seven bacteria were significantly associated with increased risk of spontaneous preterm birth, with a stronger effect seen in African American women. Interestingly, higher vaginal levels of the antimicrobial peptide β-defensin-2, a part of our innate immune system, lowered the risk of sPTB associated with cervicovaginal microbiota in an ethnicity-dependent manner.
“Predicting prematurity has been a riddle that has troubled researchers and clinicians for years, but we are finally shedding light on a path toward offering treatment to women we can identify as being at risk. Previous studies, including ours, were limited by low sample size. In establishing this large cohort, we aim to identify factors early in pregnancy that could be used to predict the risk [for] spontaneous preterm birth,” said co-senior author Jacques Ravel, PhD, professor of microbiology and immunology and senior scientist at the Institute for Genome Sciences (IGS) and director of genomics at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. “These new findings are the result of a multidisciplinary team of experts in obstetrics and microbiology, who came together and took a new approach to address this major problem in the United States and the world.”
These findings hold promise for diagnostics to accurately identify women at risk for sPTB early in pregnancy. Therapeutic strategies could include immune modulators and microbiome-based therapeutics to reduce this significant health burden.
To be updated in the field of Gynecology and Obstetrics you can participate in the Gynecology Congress 2019, for more details contact: gynecology@healthcareevent.org

Tuesday, 19 March 2019

6th Asia Pacific Gynecology and Obstetrics Congress: Maternal Fetal Medicine

6th Asia Pacific Gynecology and Obstetrics Congress: Maternal Fetal Medicine: Track 3: Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Gynecology Conferences  |  Obstetrics Conferences  |  Healthcare Conferences  | Australia | Aisa Pacif...

Maternal Fetal Medicine

Track 3: Maternal-Fetal Medicine:

Gynecology Conferences | Obstetrics Conferences | Healthcare Conferences | Australia | Aisa Pacific | Gynecology Congress 2019



Maternal-fetal medicine is a vast topic and is professional in gynecology and the Number of Research institutes working on the  Maternal-fetal medicine are approximately 33 or more and  as well as some universities which are giving training to women to be Professionals in Maternal-fetal medicine , total number of universities offering this promising topic are approximately 160 working on Maternal-fetal medicine and there is also a funding of around $30000- $50000 and Academia 30% , 20% industry and Others 50% are included in this topic.
Maternal-fetal medicine specialists are specialists within the field of obstetrics. They may perform prenatal tests, provide treatments, and perform surgeries. After birth, they may work closely with pediatricians or neonatologists. Perinatologists assist with pre-existing health concerns and complications caused by pregnancy in mothers. Obstetrician-gynecologists who undergo an additional 3 years of specialized training in the assessment and management of high-risk pregnancies are called Maternal-fetal medicine specialists. In the United States, such obstetrician-gynecologists are certified by the American Board of Obstetrician Gynecologists (ABOG) or the American Osteopathic Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
For abstract submission and for more details contact: gynecologycongress@conferenceint.com

Friday, 15 March 2019

6th Asia Pacific Gynecology and Obstetrics Congress: Submit your #abstract for #Keynote Speech, #Oral, ...

6th Asia Pacific Gynecology and Obstetrics Congress: Submit your #abstract for #Keynote Speech, #Oral, ...: Submit your # abstract for #Keynote Speech, #Oral, #Poster Presentations, Kindly submit the abstract and confirm your participation at  G...
Submit your #abstract for #Keynote Speech, #Oral, #Poster Presentations,
Kindly submit the abstract and confirm your participation at Gynecology Congress 2019
Date and Venue: July 26-27 2019 #Melbourne, #AustraliaContact Email: #gynecology@healthcareevent.org


Updates In Gynecology

Use of beta-blockers during pregnancy has been associated with an increased risk for congenital heart disease in offspring, but this finding may be related to the indication for the drug (eg, maternal hypertension) rather than causal. In an analysis of pooled data from Nordic and United States cohorts of pregnant women with hypertension, beta-blocker use in the first trimester was not associated with an increased risk for major malformations overall or for cardiac malformations compared with no exposure (unfilled beta-blocker prescription). These data add to increasing evidence that, independent of confounders such as hypertension, it is unlikely that in utero exposure to beta-blockers significantly increases risk for malformations overall or for cardiac malformations. When oral antihypertensive therapy is indicated in early pregnancy, we prescribe labetalol or methyldopa for initial therapy.